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Mitnick In The News

 

Cybersecurity books arm readers in the war against hackers

Jul 5, 2017 - CYBERSECURITY VENTURES, by Steve Morgan

The Editors at Cybersecurity Ventures read “The Hacked World Order: How Nations Fight, Trade, Maneuver, and Manipulate in the Digital Age” by Adam Segal last year and featured it here. The groundbreaking book about cyberwarfare is as relevant today and when it was published — and recommended summer reading for anyone who hasn’t gotten to it yet.

“As with other types of power, there are the great cyber powers, the middling and lagging, and those that punch above their weight” wrote Segal, in a post on The Council on Foreign Relations, when the book was first announced. “The strongest have four components: large or technologically advanced economies; public institutions that channel the energy and innovation of the private sector, adventurous and somewhat rapacious military and intelligence agencies; and an attractive story to tell about cyberspace.”

Segal’s post states that China and the United States are the only true cyber superpowers, with Russia standing just in the wings. The United Kingdom, Germany, and France have the potential to develop significant offensive cyber power but have so far showed restraint. Israel has technological innovation and military flexibility but is happy to follow the United States’ lead in Internet governance. More…

There’s a book for everyone on our Q3 list, so order one today and keep yourself on the cutting edge of cyber.

EDITORS’ CHOICE

The Art Of Invisibility… By The World’s Most Famous Hacker

Books By Kevin Mitnick

Kevin Mitnick, the world’s most famous hacker, teaches you easy cloaking and counter-measures for citizens and consumers in the age of Big Brother and Big Data.

Like it or not, your every move is being watched and analyzed. Consumer’s identities are being stolen, and a person’s every step is being tracked and stored. What once might have been dismissed as paranoia is now a hard truth, and privacy is a luxury few can afford or understand.

In this explosive yet practical book, Kevin Mitnick illustrates what is happening without your knowledge–and he teaches you “the art of invisibility.” Mitnick is the world’s most famous–and formerly the Most Wanted–computer hacker. He has hacked into some of the country’s most powerful and seemingly impenetrable agencies and companies, and at one point he was on a three-year run from the FBI. Now, though, Mitnick is reformed and is widely regarded as the expert on the subject of computer security. He knows exactly how vulnerabilities can be exploited and just what to do to prevent that from happening.

In THE ART OF INVISIBILITY Mitnick provides both online and real life tactics and inexpensive methods to protect you and your family, in easy step-by-step instructions. He even talks about more advanced “elite” techniques, which, if used properly, can maximize your privacy. Invisibility isn’t just for superheroes–privacy is a power you deserve and need in this modern age.

About the Author: Kevin Mitnick (born August 6, 1963) is an American computer security consultant, author, and hacker. In the mid nineties, he was “The World’s Most Wanted Hacker”. Since 2000, he has been a successful security consultant, public speaker and author. Kevin does security consulting for Fortune 500 companies, performs penetration testing services for the world’s largest companies and teaches Social Engineering classes to dozens of companies and government agencies.

The Hacked World Order: How Nations Fight, Trade, Maneuver, and Manipulate in the Digital Age

For more than three hundred years, the world wrestled with conflicts that arose between nation-states. Nation-states wielded military force, financial pressure, and diplomatic persuasion to create “world order.” Even after the end of the Cold War, the elements comprising world order remained essentially unchanged.

But 2012 marked a transformation in geopolitics and the tactics of both the established powers and smaller entities looking to challenge the international community. That year, the US government revealed its involvement in Operation “Olympic Games,” a mission aimed at disrupting the Iranian nuclear program through cyberattacks; Russia and China conducted massive cyber-espionage operations; and the world split over the governance of the Internet. Cyberspace became a battlefield.

Cyber conflict is hard to track, often delivered by proxies, and has outcomes that are hard to gauge. It demands that the rules of engagement be completely reworked and all the old niceties of diplomacy be recast. Many of the critical resources of statecraft are now in the hands of the private sector, giant technology companies in particular. In this new world order, cybersecurity expert Adam Segal reveals, power has been well and truly hacked.

About the Author: Adam Segal is Maurice R. Greenberg Senior Fellow for China Studies and Director of the Digital and Cyberspace Policy Program at the Council on Foreign Relations. He is the author of two books on Asia and technology, and his writing has appeared in publications such as Financial Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Foreign Affairs, Asian Wall Street Journal, and International Herald Tribune. He has appeared as a commentator on several networks including Bloomberg, CNN, NBC, NPR, and the BBC.

Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

Data and Goliath is a New York Times Bestseller written by Bruce Schneier, an internationally renowned security technologist, called a “security guru” by The Economist.

You are under surveillance right now.

Your cell phone provider tracks your location and knows who’s with you. Your online and in-store purchasing patterns are recorded, and reveal if you’re unemployed, sick, or pregnant. Your e-mails and texts expose your intimate and casual friends. Google knows what you’re thinking because it saves your private searches. Facebook can determine your sexual orientation without you ever mentioning it.

The powers that surveil us do more than simply store this information. Corporations use surveillance to manipulate not only the news articles and advertisements we each see, but also the prices we’re offered. Governments use surveillance to discriminate, censor, chill free speech, and put people in danger worldwide. And both sides share this information with each other or, even worse, lose it to cybercriminals in huge data breaches.

Much of this is voluntary: we cooperate with corporate surveillance because it promises us convenience, and we submit to government surveillance because it promises us protection. The result is a mass surveillance society of our own making. But have we given up more than we’ve gained? In Data and Goliath, security expert Bruce Schneier offers another path, one that values both security and privacy. He shows us exactly what we can do to reform our government surveillance programs and shake up surveillance-based business models, while also providing tips for you to protect your privacy every day. You’ll never look at your phone, your computer, your credit cards, or even your car in the same way again.

About the Author: Bruce Schneier has been writing about security issues on his blog since 2004, and in his monthly newsletter since 1998. He write books, articles, and academic papers. Currently, he’s the Chief Technology Officer of IBM Resilient, a fellow at Harvard’s Berkman Center, and a board member of EFF.

Future Crimes: Inside the Digital Underground and the Battle for Our Connected World

Future Crimes has been on the Bestseller lists of The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and USA Today.

One of the world’s leading authorities on global security, Marc Goodman takes readers deep into the digital underground to expose the alarming ways criminals, corporations, and even countries are using new and emerging technologies against you—and how this makes everyone more vulnerable than ever imagined.

Technological advances have benefited our world in immeasurable ways, but there is an ominous flip side: our technology can be turned against us. Hackers can activate baby monitors to spy on families, thieves are analyzing social media posts to plot home invasions, and stalkers are exploiting the GPS on smart phones to track their victims’ every move. We all know today’s criminals can steal identities, drain online bank accounts, and wipe out computer servers, but that’s just the beginning. To date, no computer has been created that could not be hacked—a sobering fact given our radical dependence on these machines for everything from our nation’s power grid to air traffic control to financial services.

With explosive insights based upon a career in law enforcement and counterterrorism, Goodman takes readers on a vivid journey through the darkest recesses of the Internet. Reading like science fiction, but based in science fact, Future Crimes explores how bad actors are primed to hijack the technologies of tomorrow, including robotics, synthetic biology, nanotechnology, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence. These fields hold the power to create a world of unprecedented abundance and prosperity. But the technological bedrock upon which we are building our common future is deeply unstable and, like a house of cards, can come crashing down at any moment.

About the Author: Marc Goodman ounded the Future Crimes Institute to inspire and educate others on the security and risk implications of newly emerging technologies. Marc also serves as the Global Security Advisor and Chair for Policy and Law at Silicon Valley’s Singularity University, a NASA and Google sponsored educational venture dedicated to using advanced science and technology to address humanity’s grand challenges.

CISO Desk Reference Guide: A Practical Guide for CISOs

A CSO review says CISO Desk Reference Guide belongs on the desk of every Chief Information Security Officer and wannabe.

An easy to use guide written by experienced practitioners for recently-hired or promoted Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs), individuals aspiring to become a CISO, as well as business and technical professionals interested in the topic of cybersecurity, including Chief Technology Officers (CTOs), Chief Information Officers (CIOs), Boards of Directors, Chief Privacy Officers, and other executives responsible for information protection.

As a desk reference guide written specifically for CISOs, this book is intended to be a trusted resource for you, your teams, and your colleagues in the C-suite. The different perspectives can be used as standalone refreshers and the five immediate next steps for each chapter give the reader a robust set of 45 actions based on roughly 100 years of relevant experience that will help you strengthen your cybersecurity programs.

About the Authors: Gary Hayslip is Deputy Director, Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) for the City of San Diego, California. As CISO he is responsible for developing and executing citywide cyber security strategy and leading teams focused on Enterprise Risk Management, Security Engineering, Application Security, Cyber Security Operations, & Cyber Security Resiliency. His mission includes creating a “risk aware” culture that places high value on securing city information resources and protecting personal information entrusted to the City of San Diego. Bill Bonney helps organizations manage risk, with a specific focus on cybersecurity, securing the Internet of Things, and identity management. Matt Stamper is both a Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) and a Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP-US), with extensive public-company experience.

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